Category Archives: Holidays

Sending a Message on Valentine’s Day

hhhhYou often hear the saying, “it’s the thought that counts.” That may be true, but the thought isn’t the only thing that counts – especially not to your valentine on this special day.

Imagine a scenario such as this: your valentine is hard at work on Valentine’s Day when a delivery driver opens the door and delivers a box to her colleague’s desk. She looks on in excitement and a bit of envy as her colleague opens the box and begins pulling out roses one-by-one, before arranging them in the accompanying vase. It’s Valentine’s Day, do you really want your valentine assembling their roses at work?

She thinks about you and wonders if a similar box will arrive for her, when suddenly the door bursts open and a man in a George Thomas Florist shirt walks in with an eye-popping bouquet of the most vivid and beautiful long-stem red roses. She watches as the driver makes his way through the office, and tightly crosses her fingers in hopes of somehow willing the delivery man to not make a sudden turn before reaching her desk.

As much as she tries to hide her smile, it modestly grows wider and wider as the delivery man approaches. By now, co-workers are peeking around office doors and over cubicle walls. The colleague in the front of the office takes a break from arranging the last of her flowers to see where the elegant roses are headed.

When the delivery driver finally makes it to her desk and confirms that she is indeed the recipient, her first thought will undeniably be of you – and just how special you made her feel.

When you send flowers, you’re sending a message. It’s easy if all you want to say with that message is: “I’m thinking of you.” A quick phone call or a brief visit to any number of websites will easily convey that message just fine. But doesn’t your Valentine deserve a stronger message than that – especially if it doesn’t take any extra time or effort on your part to let her know how you really feel about her? Send a message this year – a message that lets her know she deserves the very best.

Sending roses on Valentine’s Day is a time-honored tradition, but not all roses are the same. Roses are beautiful, but fragile, flowers that need care and love – just like your Valentine. This year, think outside that battered box and send the very best message – by sending the very best roses. When you see or hear of roses being advertised at “special” prices, in most cases, you will need to add the shipping and handling along with some additional hidden fees. Suddenly, the remarkably-low price is no longer so low anymore.

At George Thomas Florist, we would never stuff our roses in a box and drop them off with someone else to get delivered – we prefer to handle that ourselves. Grown only in the finest farms, and cared for by the finest professionals in the business, our roses are the finest and most beautiful roses you will find for your Valentine.

When you send flowers from George Thomas Florist, you can rest assured that not only are you sending the very best professionally designed and hand-delivered flowers, but you are always backed by an unconditional guarantee that is unmatched in the industry. Exceed her expectations this year and leave the details to us. Call George Thomas Florist today to make this Valentine’s Day one that will truly be remembered.

Poinsettia – The Flower of Christmas

Poinsettias are a popular favorite around Christmastime. Seeing red poinsettias with Poinsettia flowertheir pots wrapped in shiny green foil makes us feel festive at this time of year. But have you ever wondered how this distinctive plant became so closely connected with the Christmas season? Took a closer look at the poinsettia and its interesting history.

A Practical Plant

Poinsettias are native to Central America. These plants, called “cuetlaxochitl,” meaning “brilliant flower,” were used by ancient Aztecs to make purple dye for clothing and makeup. Also, the sap of a poinsettia was used to treat fevers.

A Mexican Treasure

In southern Mexico, poinsettias flower for a short amount of time in the winter. In 1828, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett, visited southern Mexico and became enchanted with the poinsettias he saw there. He brought some of the plants back to his greenhouses in South Carolina, and he nurtured his poinsettias and shared them with friends as well as botanical gardens. These plants got their English name from Poinsett.

Poinsettias and Christmas

There are many connections between poinsettias and Christmas. For one, the poinsettia plant has a similar shape to the star of Bethlehem. Also, the plant is red and green, which are colors associated with Christmas.

Caring for Your Poinsettia

Do you want your poinsettia to last beyond Christmas? If so, there are some care tips to remember. For one, water your plant only when its soil is dry. Gently stick your finger about an inch down into the soil to make sure it’s dry before watering. Also, keep it in a cool room (about 55 degrees) in the evening so it will bloom longer. With the right care, you can even get your poinsettia to rebloom!poinsettia-2-787x399

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fascinating Facts About the Flower of Christmas

  • Along with using the poinsettia as medicine for fevers, the Aztecs believed the plant had magical properties like causing a baby to be born crosswise.
  • Poinsettias grow as shrubs in southern Mexico. They can sometimes grow up to 12 feet tall!
  • Poinsettias are the national emblem of Madagascar.
  • At least $200 million worth of poinsettias are sold each year during the Christmas season.
  • The red petals of a poinsettia are really its leaves, or bracts, while its small yellow bulbs are its flowers.
  • Though the bracts of a poinsettia are not deadly to people or animals, they can make you sick.

 

Your friends at George Thomas Florist will help you find the right Poinsettia and delivered to the proper place, at the proper time.

Why Do We Carve Pumpkins and Dress Up in Costumes at Halloween?

Halloween Magic by George Thomas Florist

We love to honor tradition by celebrating holidays, especially ones with seemingly absurd origins which bring about colorful characters like the Easter Bunny, Leprechauns, Cupid, and Father Time.

We typically don’t delve too deep into why these particular characters show up, or how they got to be so popular in the first place, because it’s more fun just to go along with it than to question every little detail. But sometimes you just have to wonder why every October we let our kids dress up as pirates and princesses and take to the streets of the neighborhood searching for sugary treasure.

When left to the imagination, there aren’t many holidays that are more fun than Halloween. From carving pumpkins to trick-or-treating and haunted houses, Halloween has become a whimsical celebration of things that most people find scary or downright chilling any other time of the year.

Carving jack-o-lanterns is a tradition that began several hundred years ago in Ireland, but back in those days, they were carved from potatoes and turnips. It wasn’t until years later, after the Irish immigrated to the United States, that they discovered that pumpkins made for a much better medium due to their abundance in the new world, thus a new tradition was born.

Legend has it that the jack-o-lanterns were originally intended to frighten away the wandering soul of Stingy Jack, who was sentenced to roam the earth for eternity after tricking the devil and later finding out he wasn’t allowed into heaven or hell.

This also loosely explains why we dress up in costumes – to disguise ourselves from the souls wandering amongst us – including Stingy Jack!

Or perhaps it doesn’t.

According to Lisa Morton, author of “Trick or Treat: A history of Halloween,” dressing up as a way to scare off evil spirits is a common misconception about the holiday. Morton contends that people didn’t start dressing up until much later – as in the 1800s.

Cute & Creepy by George Thomas Florist

By that time, Halloween was known for pranks which were becoming more and more elaborate and dangerous. So much so that towns and cities were thinking about canceling Halloween because many felt that the pranks were getting out of hand.

That led to a gradual push from families, communities and civic organizations to change the nature of the holidays from pranks to the “trick or treat” traditions we know today.

Sadly, Morton’s version of buying off kids with treats and costumes is probably a bit closer to reality than the warding off evil spirits angle, but as with most holiday traditions, you never really know for sure!

Whatever the reason for dressing up and trick-or-treating, your friends at George Thomas Florist are here to get you in the mood for a spectacularly spooky Halloween! Make no bones about it, our ghoulish delights will make the wickedest witches green with envy, so stop by today – if you dare!

Remember Administrative Professionals Week – April 23-27

Gorgeous Gratitude by George Thomas Florist

One of the most curious things about holidays is their tendency to evolve and change throughout the years. One of the most recent examples is Administrative Professionals’ Week which will take place this year from April 23-27.

The origin of this annual public holiday can be traced back to World War II, when a shortage of skilled administrative personnel in the United States led to the founding of the National Secretaries Association in 1942 to recognize the contributions of administrative personnel and to help attract workers to the administrative field.

In 1981, the National Secretaries Association changed their name to Professional Secretaries International, and then in 1989 to the International Association of Administrative Professionals. As the organization’s name evolved, so did the name of the holiday, which was changed from National Secretaries Week to Professional Secretaries Week in 1981, and then renamed Administrative Professional’s week in 2000 to encompass the wide-ranging job titles and responsibilities of administrative support staff in the modern era.

Today, the holiday services to honor all support staff that keep offices and workplaces running. While many of the intended honorees work “behind the scenes” to contribute to the success of their particular business or organization, the parameters of what qualifies as an “administrative professional” are largely undefined.

Although the roles and titles of administrative assistants can vary quite a bit depending on the industry, they’re typically the employees who wear many hats in order to keep the business up and running. This could be everything from maintenance staff to general laborers to office managers and executive assistants. Their roles are often not as externally visible to customers and shareholders, but it takes diligent work, meticulous organization and careful planning to keep the office environment running smoothly, so these administrative assistants are often the under-looked heroes who play an essential role in the overall success of their organization.

Does it last all week? Is it just one day?? What’s going on???

One of the more unique aspects of Administrative Professionals’ Week is that it actually lasts an entire week instead of just one day. There is, in fact, a single day that is dedicated to the holiday – in the United States and Canada, it is celebrated on the Wednesday of the last full week of April every year.

So how did this one-day holiday morph into a week-long celebration? One of the more popular ways of acknowledging the contributions of Administrative Professionals is to take them out for lunch one day during the week. Therefore, the decision to extend the observance to a full week was made in order to space out the bookings at restaurants and eateries.

Buying lunch for administrative professionals is a terrific way of saying “thank you” to those employees who make your job easier and make you look better, but we know of another outstanding gift idea that is much more beautiful than a free lunch – and will certainly last longer!

Of course, we’re talking about flowers! Flowers make a perfect gift for Administrative Professionals Week and here at George Thomas Florist, we have you covered with a special collection that we have assembled especially for this exciting occasion.

Click here to check out our selection and pick out that special gift for the employees who go above and beyond to keep the workplace running smoothly. If you don’t see exactly what you’d like, please give us a call and we can help you find the perfect gift.

Don’t miss this opportunity to say thanks to the people who work so hard to make your business a success!

Shop George Thomas Florist for Easter and Passover

Easter Treats Basket by George Thomas Florist

Did you know that Easter is the fourth biggest floral holiday of the year? It may not get the recognition of Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, or Christmas/Hanukkah, but flowers and plants have long played an important role in Easter and Passover observances and are synonymous with the holidays in both home decorations and as gifts.

When choosing a floral gift for Easter, it’s important to keep in mind not only who it’s for, but also what it will be used for. Flowers are always appropriate for mothers, grandmothers, and other close relatives or loved ones. Of course, Easter baskets full of chocolates, Peeps, and other springtime treats are always a favorite for kids of all ages!

They also make excellent gifts for church or social groups as well as for co-workers or the staff of your child’s school or day care center and are certainly a perfect gift to take along if you have been invited to an Easter dinner or other Easter celebration.

Easter Lilies by George Thomas Florist

Lilies are popular symbols of Easter as they represent love, hope, and resurrection. White lilies are especially symbolic during Easter as they signify purity and divinity. Daisies, azaleas, daffodils, chrysanthemums, hyacinths, and tulips are also popular Easter flowers.

Celebrate Easter on Sunday, April 1, with a traditional Easter lily plant, or with a beautiful bouquet of fresh seasonal flowers from George Thomas Florist.

Did you know?

  • Egg dyes for Easter were once made from flower petals. Other natural items like tree bark, onion peels, and juices were also used to color eggs.
  • The first story of a rabbit (later named the “Easter Bunny”) hiding eggs in a garden was published in 1680.
  • Easter takes place on a Sunday, after the 40-day period called Lent. Lent is referred to as a time of fasting, but most participants focus more on giving up one significant indulgence.
  • Holy Week is celebrated during the week leading up to Easter. It begins on Palm Sunday, continues to Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and then finally, Easter Sunday.
  • The 140th annual “White House Easter Egg Roll” is scheduled for Monday, April 2. This event has been celebrated by the Presidents of the United States and their families since 1878.

Passover

Passover, or Pesach, is one of the most commonly observed Jewish holidays. It begins annually on the 15th day of the Jewish month of Nissan. This year it begins at sundown on Friday, March 30, and lasts through Saturday, April 7.

Passover is a celebration of the Israelites’ being freed from slavery in Egypt. It is also observed as a celebration of spring, of birth, and of rebirth, and of taking responsibility for yourself, the community, and the world. The first night of Passover includes a special ritual dinner called Seder.

Flowers make excellent gifts for Passover. Traditional spring-blooming flowers are used to celebrate the holiday. Sunflowers, Gerbera daisies, roses, lilies, irises, and tulips are all excellent choices for this holiday season. George Thomas Florist offers a nice assortment of centerpieces and fresh floral designs that make excellent gifts for this celebration.

Get Ready for St. Patrick’s Day with Bells of Ireland

St. Patrick’s Day Flower Basket by George Thomas Florist

When you think of St. Patrick’s Day, you think green. Obviously, shamrocks come to mind, as well as green carnations the occasional green roses, but when many people think of flowers for St. Patrick’s Day, they often overlook Bells of Ireland.

Bells of Ireland, sometimes known as shell flowers, are vertical green spires that are known to symbolize good luck. Despite their name, Bells of Ireland are not native to Ireland, and the green bells are not actually flowers, but the calyxes that surround the tiny flowers inside.

Native to Turkey and Syria, these green flowers are a member of the mint family, and are sought after for their complex, but intricate beauty as well as their longevity. They are a very popular choice for St. Patrick’s Day bouquets and are also popular wedding flowers.

A member of the mint family, Bells of Ireland grow in stalks that can reach three feet tall and make an interesting conversation piece in any bouquet. They emit a pleasant fragrance and their curious design and gentle color make them very versatile in many different types of bouquets as they seem to complement a wide variety of different flowers.

Irish Countryside by George Thomas Florist

It is best to keep Bells of Ireland cool and away from sources of heat, but they do extremely well in areas that have lots of natural light but only minimal direct sun exposure. A tabletop or windowsill is a perfect spot for a bouquet containing Bells of Ireland.

With St. Patrick’s Day just around the corner, Bells of Ireland are a perfect way to spread your Irish cheer, but why waste all that luck on one day? If you know anyone starting a new job, moving to a new home, or beginning a new endeavor, send a little bit of luck their way by choosing the remarkably wonderful Bells of Ireland.

At George Thomas Florist, we have several different designs that feature Bells of Ireland. Our most popular is the St. Patrick’s Day Basket which also contains a beautiful mix of green carnations, poms, and a festive ribbon in a wicker basket. Or, if you prefer the Bells of Ireland by themselves, our Irish Countryside design is the perfect choice. Your options don’t end there, however – we can also create a custom bouquet for you featuring Bells of Ireland. All you have to do is call and let us know what you’d like and our experienced designers can take it from there!

Celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8

International Women’s Day (IWD) is a worldwide celebration of social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women that takes place annually on March 8. This year’s theme is #PressforProgress which spotlights gender parity.

IWD is not a new holiday – in fact, it was first observed in the early 1900’s. It has, however, grown in popularity over the past few years and is now celebrated and supported around the world by the United Nations, along with governments, industry leaders, educational institutions, community groups, professional associations, women’s networks, charities, non-profit organizations, and more.

IWD is a terrific opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women as well as a chance to take action to help raise visibility and awareness in order to help drive positive change for women and accelerate gender parity around the world.

We can all do our part in helping drive better outcomes for women by becoming responsive and responsible leaders in creating a more gender-inclusive world. The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely for another 217 years, so International Women’s Day provides an opportunity for ground-breaking action that can drive greater change for women and speed up the clock on gender parity.

World-renowned feminist, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem once said, “The story of women’s struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organization but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights.”

How to get involved

  • Together we can all play a role in promoting women’s issues and rights, especially for women in developing countries. One of the easiest ways to get involved is by sharing the #PressforProgress hashtag on social media posts and encouraging your friends and followers to join in the festivities.
  • Purple is the official color for IWD, so simply wearing a purple shirt or ribbon is a good way to show your support.
  • There are numerous festivals and gatherings planned for IWD and you can check the International Women’s Day event page to see a full list of activities in your area.
  • Consider donating time or resources to women-focused charities or groups
  • Volunteer to set up your own IWD campaign. Materials and instructions can be found here.
  • Most importantly, just speak out and make your support known!

Even if you don’t want to get involved in organized IWD events, the day itself is still a great opportunity to celebrate a special woman in your life by acknowledging their hard work and sharing their stories. A small gift, like a beautiful bouquet, is always an appropriate way to show your gratitude and the smile is causes can make a big difference!